# Mongock old documentation for version 3

# Table of contents

# Add a dependency

Mongock can be used standalone or with [Spring][spring]/[Spring boot][springboot]. When Using mongock-spring you don't need to import mongock-core, as it's already imported out of the box.

# With Maven

<!-- To use standalone -->
<dependency>
<groupId>io.mongock</groupId>
<artifactId>mongock-core</artifactId>
<version>{LATEST_VERSION}</version>
</dependency>
<!-- To use with Spring -->
<dependency>
<groupId>io.mongock</groupId>
<artifactId>mongock-spring</artifactId>
<version>{LATEST_VERSION}</version>
</dependency>

# With Gradle

compile 'org.javassist:javassist:3.18.2-GA' // workround for ${javassist.version} placeholder issue*
compile 'com.github.cloudyrock.mongock:mongock-core:{LATEST_VERSION}' // standalone
compile 'com.github.cloudyrock.mongock:mongock-spring:{LATEST_VERSION}' // with Spring (in addition to mongock-core)

# Key concepts

Concept Mongock Module Type Description
@ChangeLog Common Annotation Annotation used to annotate a class that contains changeSet methods
@ChangeSet Common Annotation Annotation used to annotate a a method inside a class annotated with @ChangeLog and contains the code for a specific change
Mongock Standalone Class It's the class in charge of running the migration as standalone, independently from any framework
MongockBuiler Standalone Class It's the class used to build a Mongock instance
SpringMongock Spring Class A Mongock extension for [Spring framework][spring], allowing what a normal Mongock runner does, plus the use of MongoTemplate, SpringData and Spring Profiles
SpringMongockBuiler Spring Class It's the class used to build a SpringMongock instance
SpringBootMongock Spring boot Class A SpringMongock extension for [Spring boot][springboot] framework, allowing what a SpringMongock runner does, plus Spring ApplicationContext for custom injection in your ChangeSet methods
SpringBootMongockBuiler Spring boot Class It's the class used to build a SpringBootMongock instance

# How it works

How Mongock works is very simple. The migration consists in three main elements: Your changes(based on ChangeLog classes that contains one or more ChangeSet methods), Mongock builder and Mongock runner. To understand these terms, please refer to section Key concepts.

Basic steps for you to understand the process are:

  1. Create your ChangeLog class with ChangeSet methods in a package, which we'll call it "changes_package"
  2. Build the Mongock runner with Mongock Builder. Among other parameters, you will need to provide your "changes_package"
  3. Run Mongock object built in the previous step. You will see that this step will be automatically performed when used in frameworks like [Spring][spring], [JHipster][JHipster], etc.

# Creating change logs

ChangeLog contains a bunch of ChangeSets. ChangeSet is a single task (set of instructions made on a database). In other words ChangeLog is a class annotated with @ChangeLog and containing methods annotated with @ChangeSet.

package com.example.yourapp.changelogs;
@ChangeLog
public class DatabaseChangelog {
@ChangeSet(order = "001", id = "someChangeId", author = "testAuthor")
public void importantWorkToDo(DB db){
// task implementation
}
}

# @ChangeLog

Class with change sets must be annotated by @ChangeLog. There can be more than one change log class but in that case order argument should be provided:

@ChangeLog(order = "001")
public class DatabaseChangelog {
//...
}

ChangeLogs are sorted alphabetically by order argument and changesets are applied due to this order.

# @ChangeSet

Method annotated by @ChangeSet is taken and applied to the database. History of applied change sets is stored in a collection called dbchangelog (by default) in your MongoDB

# Annotation parameters:

Parameter Type Mandatory Considerations Description
id String YES Must be Unique Name of a change set, must be unique for all change logs in a database
author String YES N/A Author of a change set
order String Optional Alphabetic order String for sorting change sets in one changelog. Sorting in alphabetical order, ascending. It can be a number, a date etc.
runAlways Boolean Optional default: false ChangeSet will always be executed but only first execution event will be stored in dbchangelog collection
version String Optional default: "0" efines a version on which this changeset is relate to. E.g. "0.1" means, this changeset should be applied to schema version 0.1 of your MongoDB. See Defining ChangeSet methods with versions for more information.

# Defining ChangeSet methods

Method annotated by @ChangeSet can have one of the following definition:

@ChangeSet(order = "001", id = "someChangeWithoutArgs", author = "testAuthor")
public void someChange1() {
// method without arguments can do some non-db changes
}
@ChangeSet(order = "002", id = "someChangeWithMongoDatabase", author = "testAuthor")
public void someChange2(MongoDatabase db) {
// type: com.mongodb.client.MongoDatabase : original MongoDB driver v. 3.x, operations allowed by driver are possible
// example:
MongoCollection<Document> mycollection = db.getCollection("mycollection");
Document doc = new Document("testName", "example").append("test", "1");
mycollection.insertOne(doc);
}
@ChangeSet(order = "005", id = "someChangeWithSpringDataTemplate", author = "testAuthor")
public void someChange5(MongoTemplate mongoTemplate) {
// type: org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.MongoTemplate
// Spring Data integration allows using MongoTemplate in the ChangeSet
// example:
mongoTemplate.save(myEntity);
}
@ChangeSet(order = "006", id = "someChangeWithSpringDataTemplate", author = "testAuthor")
public void someChange6(MongoTemplate mongoTemplate, Environment environment) {
// type: org.springframework.data.mongodb.core.MongoTemplate
// type: org.springframework.core.env.Environment
// Spring Data integration allows using MongoTemplate and Environment in the ChangeSet
}

# Defining ChangeSet methods with versions

Method annotated by @ChangeSet have also the possibility to contain a version. This is a useful feature from a consultancy point of view. The more descriptive scenario is where a software provider has several customers who he provides his software to. The clients may be using different versions of the software at the same time. So when he install the product in a customer, the changeSets need to be applied depending on the product version. With this solution, he can tag every changeSet with his product version and will tell mongock which version range to apply.

@ChangeSet(order = "001", id = "someChangeToVersionOne", author = "testAuthor", version = "1")
public void someChange1(MongoDatabase db) {
}
@ChangeSet(order = "002", id = "someChangeToVersionOneDotOne", author = "testAuthor", version = "1.1")
public void someChange2(MongoDatabase db) {
}
@ChangeSet(order = "003", id = "someChangeToVersionTwoDotFiveDotOne", author = "testAuthor", systemVersion = "2.5.1")
public void someChange3(MongoDatabase db) {
}
@ChangeSet(order = "004", id = "someChangeToVersionTwoDotFiveDotFive", author = "testAuthor", systemVersion = "2.5.5")
public void someChange5(MongoDatabase db) {
}
@ChangeSet(order = "005", id = "someChangeToVersionTwoDotSix", author = "testAuthor", systemVersion = "2.6")
public void someChange6(MongoDatabase db) {
}

With specifying versions you are able to upgrade to specific versions:

MongoClient mongoclient = new MongoClient(new MongoClientURI("yourDbName", yourMongoClientBuilder));
Mongock runner= new MongockBuilder(mongoclient, "yourDbName", "com.package.to.be.scanned.for.changesets")
.setLockQuickConfig()
.setStartSystemVersion("1")
.setEndSystemVersion("2.5.5")
.build();
runner.execute(); // ------> starts migration changesets from systemVersion 1 to 2.5.5

This example will execute ChangeSet 1, 2 and 3, because the specified systemVersion in the changeset should be greater equals the startSystemVersion and lower than endSystemVersion.

# When use each module

# When use Mongock standalone

Mongock standalone(mongock-core) is the original Mongock implementation. It provides the main features and while it still very easy to run, it does not rely on any framework to be executed, so that responsibility belongs to you.

As mentioned, it's recommended when you are running an standalone java application without any framework or, even using a framework, you want to have the control of when Mongock is executed and you don't need any extra feature provided by Spring, such as bean injection, profiles, converters, etc.

# When use SpringMongock

This is a specialization of Mongock for [Spring][spring] users. SpringMongock runner implements the interface [InitializingBean][InitializingBean] provided by [Spring][spring]. So by instantiating the Mongock runner as singleton bean in the spring context, the framework will take care of the dependencies and will execute at startup.

By using SpringMongock you can also take advantage of the Spring Profile's benefits and, if using MongoTemplate, all the SpringData features are implicitly provided.

Note: We really recommend using [MongoTemplate][MongoTemplate] for building SpringMongock runner. It provides a better integration with [Spring][spring] and it's the only way of taking advantage of SpringData, so you can use features like Mongo [CustomConversions][customConversions], etc.

# When use SpringBootMongock

The main benefit of using SpringBoot integration is that it provides a totally flexible way to inject dependencies, so you can inject any object to your changeSets by using [Spring boot][springboot] [ApplicationContext][ApplicationContext].

In order to use this feature you need to instantiate the SpringBootMongock runner and provide the required configuration. Mongock will run as an [ApplicationRunner][ApplicationRunner] within [Spring boot][springboot]. In terms of execution, it will be very similar to the standard Spring implementation, the key difference is that ApplicationRunner beans run after (as opposed to during) the context is fully initialized.

Note: We really recommend using [MongoTemplate][MongoTemplate] for building SpringBootMongock runner. It provides a better integration with Spring boot and it's the only way of taking advantage of SpringData, so you can use features like Mongo [CustomConversions][customConversions], etc.

Note: Using this implementation means you need all the dependencies in your changeLogs(parameters in methods annotated with @ChangeSet) declared as Spring beans.

Note: In order to have your beans injected into your changeSet methods, you need to provide the [SpringBoot][springBoot] [ApplicationContext][ApplicationContext] at building time.

Important note: Currently(we are working on it, please take a look to our Roadmap) the dependencies injected by the ApplicationContext (other than [MongoTemplate][MongoTemplate] and [MongoDatabase][MongoDatabase]) won't be covered by the lock. This means that if you are accessing to Mongo through a different mechanism to the ones mentioned, the lock synchronization is not guaranteed as Mongock only ensures synchronization when Mongo is accessed via either [MongoTemplate][MongoTemplate], [MongoDatabase][MongoDatabase] or [DB][DB]. For more information, please consult the lock section

# Build parameters

# Common build parameters

Parameter Injection type Default Description
mongoClient constructor N/A New database connection client API. Recommended for standalone use over legacyMongoClient
legacyMongoClient constructor N/A Old database connection client API. Deprecated
databaseName constructor Mandatory Database name
changeLogScanPackage constructor Mandatory Package path where the changeLogs are located
enabled setter true Migration process will run only if this option is set to true
changeLogCollectionName setter mongockChangeLog ChangeLog collection name
lockCollectionName setter mongockLock Lock collection name
metadata setter empty Map Map for custom data you want to attach to your migration
throwExceptionIfCannotObtainLock String false Mongock will throw MongockException if lock can not be obtained
lockAcquiredForMinutes setter 24 * 60(1 day) Indicates how long the lock will be hold once acquired in minutes
maxWaitingForLockMinutes setter 3 Indicates max time in minutes to wait for the lock in each try
maxTries setter 1 Number of times Mongock will try to acquire the lock
startSystemVersion setter "0" System version to start with (see Defining ChangeSet methods with versions())
endSystemVersion setter Integer.MAX_VALUE System version to end with (see Defining ChangeSet methods with versions())

# SpringMongock build parameters

Provides all the commons parameters plus:

Parameter Injection type Default Description
mongoTemplate constructor N/A Spring MongoTemplate. Recommended for Spring and Spring boot use. Without this, specific Spring feature related to Mongo, like Spring converters, repositories and so on, won't work
springEnvironment setter null Spring Environment. Recommended for Spring. Without this Spring Profiles won't work. Not needed in Spring boot if ApplicationContext is provided

# SpringBootMongock build parameters

Provides all the commons and Spring parameters plus:

Parameter Injection type Default Description
springContext setter null Spring Application context. Recommended. Required for bean injections into ChangeSet methods. If this is provided, Spring Environment is not needed.

# Build and run

Once we have seen how to create our migration classes in Creating change logs, we need to build and run Mongock. As mentioned, we have three modes: standalone, Spring and Spring boot

Note: For backward compatibility, the lock is configured by default with too long values(24 hours). This is really basic strategy which can produce unexpected behaviour like not been able to execute Mongock in the next 24hours if there is any error and the lock is not released. For this reason we RECOMMEND to activate it by either setting the values manually with setLockConfig or with the default values for a proper lock mechanism with setLockQuickConfig

by default the lock is configured with values(24 hours) that in practice is like . This means that the lock is there but the time is taken is so long that it's like you have no lock, or even worse, if anything happens and the lock is not released, the next execution won't be able to run before 24 hours.

# Build and run standalone

For more attributes, please see Build parameters

Mongock runner= new MongockBuilder(mongoclient, "databaseName", "changeLogScanPackage")
.setLockQuickConfig() OR .setLockConfig(3, 4, 3)
...other setters
.build();
runner.execute(); // ------> starts migration changeSets straight away

# Build and run SpringMongock

If you use Spring, mongock can be instantiated as a singleton bean in the Spring context. In this case the migration process will be executed automatically on startup. You can use MongoClient, like with standalone, but we recommend using MongoTemplate.

For more attributes, please see Build parameters

@Bean
public SpringMongock springMongock(MongoTemplate mongoTemplate, Environment springEnvironment) {
return new SpringMongockBuilder(mongoTemplate, "changeLogScanPackage")
.setSpringEnvironment(springEnvironment)
.setLockQuickConfig() OR .setLockConfig(3, 4, 3)
...other setters
.build();
}

# Build and run SpringBootMongock

You can see the benefits of using SpringBootMongock in this section By injecting the Spring ApplicationRunner, you are implicitly injecting the Spring Environment, so you don't need to do it manually.

As mentioned in previous sections, with SpringBootMongock now you can use your beans in your changeSets, please see this section to discover how

For more attributes, please see Build parameters

@Bean
public SpringBootMongock mongock(MongoTemplate mongoTemplate, ApplicationContext springContext) {
return new SpringBootMongockBuilder(mongoTemplate, "changeLogScanPackage")
.setApplicationContext(springContext)
.setLockQuickConfig() OR .setLockConfig(3, 4, 3)
.build();
}

# Spring specific features

# Injecting custom dependencies with Spring Boot

Right now this is only possible by using SpringBootMongock(no SpringMongock) and injecting Spring Application Context to your builder as shown below. As explained in section Build and run SpringBootMongock, once you have injected the Spring ApplicationContext, you can use your beans in Mongock changeSet methods via method parameter. Don't use @autowired annotation.

For example having a springdata repository 'PersonRepository' in your project, that you wish to use in your changeSet, you can use it like follow

@ChangeLog(order = "1")
@Profile("test")
public class ChangelogForTestEnv{
@ChangeSet(author = "testuser", id = "myTestChangest", order = "01")
public void testingEnvOnly(MongoTemplate template, PersonRepository repository){
List<Person> allPersons = repository.findAll();
}
}

Note: You shouldn't use the repository to write to Mongo, as it won't be covered by the lock.(this feature which allows you to use your own repositories freely in your changeSet methods will be available in future releases)

# Using Spring profiles

This feature available for both Springs builders, SpringMongock and SpringBootMongock

mongock accepts Spring's org.springframework.context.annotation.Profile annotation. If a change log or change set class is annotated with @Profile, then it is activated for current application profiles.

Mongock will soon support the new Profile expression approach from Spring 5 in

# Annotating ChangeLogs and ChangeSets with Profile

Example 1: annotated change set will be invoked for a dev profile

@Profile("dev")
@ChangeSet(author = "testuser", id = "myDevChangest", order = "01")
public void devEnvOnly(MongoDatabase db){
// ...
}

Example 2: all change sets in a changelog will be invoked for a test profile

@ChangeLog(order = "1")
@Profile("test")
public class ChangelogForTestEnv{
@ChangeSet(author = "testuser", id = "myTestChangest", order = "01")
public void testingEnvOnly(MongoDatabase db){
// ...
}
}

# Enabling Profile annotation on Mongock

This feature available for both Springs builders, SpringMongock and SpringBootMongock

To enable the @Profile integration, please inject org.springframework.core.env.Environment to your runner.

@Bean
@Autowired
public SpringMongock mongock(Environment environment) {
SpringMongock runner = new SpringMongockBuilder(mongoclient, "yourDbName", "com.package.to.be.scanned.for.changesets")
.setSpringEnvironment(environment)
.setLockQuickConfig()
.build();
//... etc
}

# Adding metadata

Sometimes there is the need of adding some extra information to the mongockChangeLog documents at execution time. This is address by Mongock allowing to set a Map object to the MongockBuilder(core, Spring and Springboot) with the metadata which will be added later to each mongockChangeLog document inserted in the Mongock 'transaction'.

Map<String, Object> metadata = new HashMap<>();
metadata.put("string_key", "string_value");
Mongock runner = new MongockBuilder(mongoclient, "yourDbName", "com.package.to.be.scanned.for.changesets")
.setLockQuickConfig()
.withMetadata(metadata)
.build();
//... etc
}

# Configuring Lock

In order to execute the changelogs, mongock needs to manage the lock to ensure only one instance executes a changelog at a time. By default the lock is reserved 24 hours and, in case the lock is held by another mongock instance, will ignore the execution and no exception will be sent, unless the parameter throwExceptionIfCannotObtainLock is set to true.

There are 3 parameters to configure:

Parameter Description
lockAcquiredForMinutes Number of minutes mongock will acquire the lock for. It will refresh the lock when is close to be expired anyway.
maxTries Max tries when the lock is held by another mongock instance.
maxWaitingForLockMinutes Max minutes mongock will wait for the lock in every try.

To configure these parameters there are two methods: setLockConfig and setLockConfig and setLockQuickConfig. Both will set the parameter throwExceptionIfCannotObtainLock to true.

@Bean @Autowired
public Mongock mongock(Environment environment) {
Mongock runner = new mongock(uri);
runner.setLockConfig(5, 6, 3);
}

or quick config with 3 minutes for lockAcquiredFor, 3 max tries and 4 minutes for maxWaitingForLock

@Bean @Autowired
public Mongock mongock(Environment environment) {
Mongock runner = new mongock(uri);
runner.setLockQuickConfig();
}

# Known issues

# Mongo transaction limitations

Note: We are working on providing transaction support and UNDO operations. However until then, this will still be relevant and even with that, will remain relevant for older MongoDB versions without transaction support. Please checkout our roadmap

Due to Mongo limitations, there is no way to provide atomicity at ChangelogSet level. So a Changelog could need more than one execution to be finished, as any interruption could happen, leaving the changelog in a inconsistent state. If that happens, the next time mongock is executed it will try to finish the changelog execution, but it could already be half executed.

For this reason, the developer in charge of the changelog's design, should make sure that: